The Underground Librarian

What cats do before meeting curiosity sellers….

Kitchen Basics Request – addition

Posted by Tespid on April 19, 2014

A friend told me several where in need, so I’m posting what I’m eating tonight.

Basic cooking to the hilt, nothing too fancy. >>Thought about it last night, not everybody has access to supplies for Mexican food, so there is a substitution or two to the ingredients list. I can’t promise you profound flavor, but it sits well on the stomach when you are tired<< ok, sweets, here it is:

Serves: 1

2 tostadas or two pieces of toast

1 can of kidney beans, mashed with a potato masher

1/4 teaspoon onion powder

1/8 teaspoon cumin

Meat of one roasted chicken leg chopped thin

about 1/4 cup of cheddar cheese

1 Tablespoon of salsa or chopped tomato per tostada/slice of toast

 

Place the tostadas on a plate. In a small microwave safe container take mashed kidney beans, onion powder, cumin and a tablespoon or two of water and mix thoroughly. Heat in the microwave oven with the chicken on a separate dish for 2 minutes. Meanwhile grate the cheddar on a cutting board. After time is up take a spoon and spread a tablespoon or two of bean mash over the tostadas. Top with cheese, chicken and salsa. Eat.

I was busy cleaning the kitchen between steps, so mine got cold. I ate one anyway. An hour late the other is in the toaster oven warming up. Served with lemonade. FYI: I figure you can use any bean as long as it is cooked. I could be wrong though, every palate is a little different from the next.

To post or not to post. Later is the solution.

~Pastied Pastry Cook

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Further Considerations

Posted by Tespid on April 15, 2014

So I got lazy and did not use fresh corn oil this time.

I decided to dive in and finish off the batter from the last post. I needed a spot of sweet before the batter went bad in the refrigerator.  I dove in head first and the taste of fish from yesterday is mild but the onion and garlic in the coating is not subtle at all. Also the batter doesn’t seem to spread out well with a 2 inch scoop.

This taste adventure leads me to think mixing a portion of onion powder and garlic powder in the pumpkin mix would be good.

I’d also cut back on the sugar significantly (if not completely) to go for a savory flavor instead. I can’t seem to do without the drizzled honey, so I will not be taking that out of the recipe.

Musing in and about the kitchen sometimes, just sometimes makes the sun come out and make friends.

Indulge at your own risk.

~Pastied Pastry Chef out.

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Compliments of the test kitchen

Posted by Tespid on April 7, 2014

Untitled: Test kitchen April 2014

For the cold chill in April before the Sun dons us all:

1 cup or 1/2 can of pumpkin

2 large eggs

1-2 Tablespoons whole milk

3/4 cup of granulated sugar

one cap full of vanilla ( I used Mexican Vanilla though Madagascar will work)

1-1.5 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 white flour

1/4-1/2 Hershey’s cinnamon chips or 1/2-1 teaspoon cinnamon

Corn oil for frying. Fill the pan with oil till it fills to two inches deep measured from the middle. heat the oil while mixing the batter. Mix ingredients one by one in a bowl starting with the pumpkin to folding in the flour and cinnamon chips. Drop 1-2 Tablespoons of mixture in oil. Smooth out into a slightly larger circle with a metal soon. Flip over when the bubbles have stopped forming on top and the batter has changed to a lighter color. Remove from oil to a paper towel lined plate to cool. For a stronger flavor, drizzle with honey.

I’ll come up with title eventually and I hope that does not mar your experience.

Pastied Pastry Chef out.

ok, four of these bad boys later and I’m tweakin the recipe in my head. Apparently I have a traditin of this approach, because I got called on it before I thought of it. Anyway the tweak, without being tested is as follows:

One Fried Pumpkin Bread circle about 3-4 inches in diameter on the bottom of the plate.

Layered on top of the bread is one quarter of a pear sliced into slivers or wedges. These have been softened in a pan with a little bit of butter or poached in a little water or white wine if you’d like to dance on the edge a bit.

Crush two or three salted pretzels and sprinkle on top of the pears. The key is to add a crunch and hint of bitter to counter the pungent sweetness.

Cap the tower with sweetened whipping cream spiked with a tablespoon of espresso powder. I’m beginning to doubt the espresso need, but the hint of bitter as well may lead to a taste interaction on the palette that may please more than confuse.

Drizzle lightly with caramel and honey.

When it comes down to brass tax on availability substitute apples for pears and a larger grain of salt to sprinkle over the fruit than pretzels. If so end the layering there and feast.

Back to day dreaming a little bit longer.

Pastied Pastry Chef out.

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Screenshot Pa. Journals: Prescription drug registry

Posted by Tespid on April 5, 2014

Prescription drug registry would help cut deaths from abuse: As I See It

drug overdose art.jpg
(Shutterstock.com )

PennLive Op-Ed By PennLive Op-Ed
on April 01, 2014 at 2:54 PM, updated April 01, 2014 at 3:08 PM

 
Reddit

By Phil Bauer

Abuse of prescription drugs has fueled the biggest drug epidemic in Pennsylvania history. This is not news, however. We have known this for several years.

According to the Health Department’s Bureau of Health Statistics and Research, approximately 2000 Pennsylvanians die a drug related death each year, and countless other families are dealing with the devastation caused by drug abuse.

In 1991, 684 Pennsylvanians died from drugs. By 2001, the number had grown to 1,000. A decade later, the death toll had more than doubled to 2,290. Drugs are the leading cause of accidental death in our state. Abuse of these drugs now caused more deaths than heroin and cocaine combined.

The solution to this public health crisis will not be easy. People need to be educated about the dangers of abusing medicines. We need to assure that pharmaceutical companies market their products ethically and responsibly. We need to make sure that drugs in our homes are secure at all times. And we also need to safely dispose of unneeded, unused or expired drugs.

Another critical part of the solution is to establish a prescription drug database that would give physicians, pharmacists, and law enforcement tools which will allow them to identify those seeking drugs for non-medical purposes.

The database would support access to legitimate medical use of prescription drugs, identify and deter or prevent drug abuse and diversion, and facilitate and encourage the identification, intervention with and treatment of persons addicted to prescription drugs.

All of our neighboring states either have a prescription drug database or have passed legislation to create one.

Unfortunately, our state legislators have been unwilling, or unable, to make this happen.

All of our neighboring states either have a prescription drug database, or have passed legislation to create one. Ohio passed legislation to create a database in 2005, New Jersey in 2007, Maryland in 2011, and New York and Delaware in 2013.

Legislation to create a database in Pennsylvania was originally proposed several years ago, yet it never made it out of the Capitol. In the current legislative session, the House of Representatives passed a prescription drug monitoring program bill, H.B. 1694. It now sits in the Senate Public Health & Welfare Committee. A similar bill, S.B. 1180, is awaiting floor action in the Senate.

There is little reason to believe that either of these will be passed by the end of the year, however. Too much negotiating with stakeholders and, seemingly, a lack of cooperation between the two chambers and parties.

Pennsylvania is woefully behind in addressing this public health crisis. The time for negotiating is over – there is too much at stake. What has been the cost as our elected senators and representatives fail to act on this crisis? Countless lives lost and too many devastated families.

The Pennsylvania Legislature should have been a part of the solution. Tragically, they are now part of the problem.

York resident Phil Bauer has been an advocate for prescription drug safety since the prescription drug related death of his youngest son, Mark, in 2004.

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Is this my ‘burb or your town? Same sh#t different day.

Posted by Tespid on April 5, 2014

Smoke shops do not bring prosperity

The Pike County Courier-6 hours ago
A tale of two sidewalks: the north side of Pennsylvania Avenue in … like marijuana and cocaine, a view backed by the National Institutes of …

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National Heroin Day

Posted by Tespid on April 5, 2014

‘We’re all paying:’ Heroin spreads misery across the nation

FILE - In this Monday, May 6, 2013 file photo, a drug addict prepares a needle to inject himself with heroin in front of a church in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. The death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman in February 2014 spotlighted the reality that heroin is no longer limited to the back alleys of American life. Once mainly a city phenomenon, the drug has spread to the country and suburbs. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

FILE – In this Monday, May 6, 2013 file photo, a drug addict prepares a needle to inject himself with heroin in front of a church in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. The death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman in February 2014 spotlighted the reality that heroin is no longer limited to the back alleys of American life. Once mainly a city phenomenon, the drug has spread to the country and suburbs. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

On a beautiful Sunday last October, Detective Dan Douglas stood in a suburban Minnesota home and looked down at a lifeless 20-year-old — a needle mark in his arm, a syringe in his pocket. It didn’t take long for Douglas to realize that the man, fresh out of treatment, was his second heroin overdose that day.

“You just drive away and go, ‘Well, here we go again,’” says the veteran cop.

In Butler County, Ohio, heroin overdose calls are so common that the longtime EMS coordinator likens the situation to “coming in and eating breakfast — you just kind of expect it to occur.” A local rehab facility has a six-month wait. One school recently referred an 11-year-old boy who was shooting up intravenously.

FILE - In this August 1971 file photo, American troops who are addicted to heroin sit together at a U.S. Army amnesty center in Long Binh, Vietnam. Heroin’s reputation in the 1970s was 'a really hard-core, dangerous street drug, a killer drug, but there’s a whole generation who didn’t grow up with that kind of experience with heroin,' said New York City Special Narcotics Prosecutor Bridget Brennan, whose office was created in 1971 in response to heroin use and related crime. 'It’s been glamorized, certainly much more than it was during the '70s.' (AP Photo/Neal Ulevich)

FILE – In this August 1971 file photo, American troops who are addicted to heroin sit together at a U.S. Army amnesty center in Long Binh, Vietnam. Heroin’s reputation in the 1970s was “a really hard-core, dangerous street drug, a killer drug, but there’s a whole generation who didn’t grow up with that kind of experience with heroin,” said New York City Special Narcotics Prosecutor Bridget Brennan, whose office was created in 1971 in response to heroin use and related crime. “It’s been glamorized, certainly much more than it was during the ’70s.” (AP Photo/Neal Ulevich)

FILE - In this Sept. 22, 1957 file photo, police Detectives John Matassa, center and Sheldon Teller, right, examine the arms of a suspected narcotics addict and dealer in New York. Eric Schneider, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania said after World War II, heroin became a drug primarily used by blacks and Puerto Ricans in the Northeast and by Mexican Americans in the West. In the late 1960s, at the height of the hippie drug experimentation era, there was a resurgence of heroin use among young white people in the East Village and in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district. (AP Photo)

FILE – In this Sept. 22, 1957 file photo, police Detectives John Matassa, center and Sheldon Teller, right, examine the arms of a suspected narcotics addict and dealer in New York. Eric Schneider, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania said after World War II, heroin became a drug primarily used by blacks and Puerto Ricans in the Northeast and by Mexican Americans in the West. In the late 1960s, at the height of the hippie drug experimentation era, there was a resurgence of heroin use among young white people in the East Village and in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district. (AP Photo)

 FILE - In this March 17, 1947 file photo, about 459 ounces of pure heroin valued at over one million dollars in the black market lies on table in Customs Enforcement Bureau in New York following seizure aboard the French freighter Saint Tropez after its arrival in New York City from Marseilles. Cesar Negro, Marseilles seaman, second from left, was arrested on charges of smuggling narcotics and Rene Bruchard, second from right, the ship's linen keeper, is being held for questioning. Port Patrol Officers Michael F. Munro, left; Arthur H. Cumming, center, and Lawrence F. Murray, right, are credited with discovering the heroin during a routine check of the seamen. (AP Photo)

FILE – In this March 17, 1947 file photo, about 459 ounces of pure heroin valued at over one million dollars in the black market lies on table in Customs Enforcement Bureau in New York following seizure aboard the French freighter Saint Tropez after its arrival in New York City from Marseilles. Cesar Negro, Marseilles seaman, second from left, was arrested on charges of smuggling narcotics and Rene Bruchard, second from right, the ship’s linen keeper, is being held for questioning. Port Patrol Officers Michael F. Munro, left; Arthur H. Cumming, center, and Lawrence F. Murray, right, are credited with discovering the heroin during a routine check of the seamen. (AP Photo)

In this Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014 photo, Dr. Marcus Romanello, medical director for the Fort Hamilton Hospital emergency room, checks equipment in the emergency room of the hospital in Hamilton, Ohio. The hospital saw 200 heroin overdose cases last year, and countless related problems: abscesses from using unsterile needles, heart-damaging endocarditis and potentially fatal sepsis infections. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

In this Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014 photo, Dr. Marcus Romanello, medical director for the Fort Hamilton Hospital emergency room, checks equipment in the emergency room of the hospital in Hamilton, Ohio. The hospital saw 200 heroin overdose cases last year, and countless related problems: abscesses from using unsterile needles, heart-damaging endocarditis and potentially fatal sepsis infections. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

In this Wednesday, March 12, 2014 photo, former heroin addict David Fitzgerald stands near the rehabilitation clinic where he works as the leader of the mentor program in Portland, Ore. To counter addicts from using again, Central City Concern accompanies clients to housing appointments, keeps their daylight hours filled with to-dos and requires they spend idle hours at the facility, where they also sleep. (AP Photo/Steve Dykes)

In this Wednesday, March 12, 2014 photo, former heroin addict David Fitzgerald stands near the rehabilitation clinic where he works as the leader of the mentor program in Portland, Ore. To counter addicts from using again, Central City Concern accompanies clients to housing appointments, keeps their daylight hours filled with to-dos and requires they spend idle hours at the facility, where they also sleep. (AP Photo/Steve Dykes)

Sheriff Richard Jones has seen crack, methamphetamine and pills plague his southwestern Ohio community but calls heroin a bigger scourge. Children have been forced into foster care because of addicted parents; shoplifting rings have formed to raise money to buy fixes.

“There are so many residual effects,” he says. “And we’re all paying for it.”

Heroin is spreading its misery across America. And communities everywhere are indeed paying.

The death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman spotlighted the reality that heroin is no longer limited to the back alleys of American life. Once mainly a city phenomenon, the drug has spread — gripping postcard villages in Vermont, middle-class enclaves outside Chicago, the sleek urban core of Portland, Ore., and places in between and beyond.

Cocaine, painkillers and tranquilizers are all used more than heroin, and the latest federal overdose statistics show that in 2010 the vast majority of drug overdose deaths involved pharmaceuticals, with heroin accounting for less than 10 percent. But heroin’s escalation is troubling. Last month, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder called the 45 percent increase in heroin overdose deaths between 2006 and 2010 an “urgent and growing public health crisis.”

In 2007, there were an estimated 373,000 heroin users in the U.S. By 2012, the number was 669,000, with the greatest increases among those 18 to 25. First-time users nearly doubled in a six-year period ending in 2012, from 90,000 to 156,000.

Experts note that many users turned to heroin after a crackdown on prescription drug “pill mills” made painkillers such as OxyContin harder to find and more costly. It’s killing because it can be extremely pure or laced with other powerful narcotics. That, coupled with a low tolerance once people start using again after treatment, is catching addicts off guard.

In hard-hit places, police, doctors, parents and former users are struggling to find solutions and save lives.

“I thought my suburban, middle-class family was immune to drugs such as this,” says Valerie Pap, who lost her son, Tanner, to heroin in 2012 in Anoka County, Minn., and speaks out to try and help others. “I’ve come to realize that we are not immune. … Heroin will welcome anyone into its grasp.”

___

IN MINNESOTA: TAKING THE MESSAGE TO THE MASSES

The night before Valentine’s Day, some 250 people filed into a church in Spring Lake Park, Minn. There were moms and dads of addicts, as well as children whose parents brought them in hopes of scaring them away from smack.

From the stage, Dan Douglas gripped a microphone as a photograph appeared overhead on a screen: A woman in the fetal position on a bathroom floor. Then another: A woman “on the nod” — passed out with drug paraphernalia and a shoe near her face.

“You just don’t win with heroin,” Douglas told the crowd. “You die or you go to jail.”

It was the third such forum held over two weeks in Anoka County, home to 335,000 people north of Minneapolis. Since 1999, 55 Anoka County residents have died from heroin-related causes. Only one other Minnesota county reported more heroin-related deaths — 58 — and it has a population three-and-a-half times greater than Anoka’s.

Five years ago, county officials were focused on stamping out meth labs. Then investigators noticed a climb in pharmacy robberies, and started finding Percocet and OxyContin during routine marijuana busts.

As prescription drug abuse rose, so, too, did crackdowns aimed at shutting down pill mills and increasing tracking of prescriptions and pharmacy-hopping pill seekers. Users turned to heroin. “It hit us in the face in the form of dead bodies,” says Douglas.

Authorities are working to educate doctors about the dangers of overprescribing painkillers and are fighting to get heroin off the streets. The idea for the forums came not from police but rather from Pap, a third-grade teacher whose youngest son died of a heroin overdose.

Tanner graduated from high school with honors. In the fall of 2012, he was pursuing a psychology degree at the University of Minnesota, and dreamed of becoming a drug counselor. He had not, to his mother’s knowledge, ever used drugs — and certainly not heroin.

Then one day Tanner’s roommates found the 21-year-old unconscious in his bedroom.

Amid her grief, Pap realized something needed to be done to educate others. She met with county officials, and soon after the community forums were developed. At each, Pap shared her family’s story.

“Our lives have been forever changed,” she told the crowd in Spring Lake Park. “Heroin took it all away,”

___

IN OHIO: OD ANTIDOTE HELPS SAVE SOME

Brakes screech. The hospital door flies open. A panicked voice shouts: “Help my friend!” An unconscious young man, in the throes of a heroin overdose, is lifted onto a gurney.

It’s known as a “drive-up, drop-off,” and it’s happened repeatedly at Ohio’s Fort Hamilton Hospital. The staff’s quick response and a dose of naloxone, an opiate-reversing drug, bring most patients back. Some are put on ventilators. A few never revive.

“We’ve certainly had our share of deaths,” says Dr. Marcus Romanello, head of the ER. “At least five died that I am acutely aware of … because I personally cared for them.”

Romanello joined the hospital about two years ago, just as the rise of heroin was becoming noticeable in Hamilton, a blue-collar city of 60,000 people. Now it seems to be reaching into nearly every part of daily life.

“If you stood next to somebody and just started a conversation about heroin, you’d hear: ‘Oh yeah, my nephew’s on heroin. My next-door neighbor’s on heroin,’” says Candy Murray Abbott, who helped her own 27-year-old son through withdrawal.

Heroin-related deaths have more than tripled in Butler County, where Hamilton is the county seat. There were 55 deaths last year, and within one two-week period, the city’s emergency paramedic units responded to 18 heroin overdoses.

Users run the gamut, says EMS veteran Jennifer Mason — from streetwalkers to business executives. They die in cars, public parks, restaurant bathrooms.

Romanello’s hospital saw 200 heroin overdose cases last year. Overdose patients usually bounce back quickly after given naloxone, or Narcan. It works by blocking the brain receptors that opiates latch onto and helping the body “remember” to take in air.

At least 17 states and the District of Columbia allow Narcan to be distributed to the public, and bills are pending in some states to increase access to it. In Ohio, a new law allows a user’s friends or relatives to administer Narcan, on condition that they call 911.

Romanello says his patients are usually relieved and grateful by the time they leave his hospital. “They say, ‘Thank you for saving my life,’ and walk out the door. But then, the withdrawal symptoms start to kick in.”

“You would think that stopping breathing is hitting rock bottom,” adds Mason. “They don’t remember that. … You’ve blocked the heroin, and they have to have it. They go back out to get more.”

___

IN OREGON: A FORMER ADDICT FIGHTS BACK

They smile down from photos: recovering addicts holding plates of food at a group picnic last year. From inside Central City Concern in downtown Portland, Ore., David Fitzgerald looks over the faces.

Are they all still sober? Are they all still alive?

“Most of them,” says Fitzgerald, a former addict who leads the mentor program at the rehab clinic. “Not all.”

Heroin cut a gash through the Pacific Northwest in the 1990s. Then prescription pills took over until prices rose. Now the percentage of those in treatment for heroin in Oregon is back up to levels not seen since the ’90s — nearly 8,000 people last year — and the addicts are getting younger.

Central City’s clients reflect that. In 2008, 25 percent of them were younger than 35. Last year the number went to 40 percent.

The crop of younger addicts presents a new problem — finding appropriately aged mentors to match them with. But Fitzgerald has hope in 26-year-old Felecia Padgett. Before sobriety, Padgett found herself selling heroin to people younger than herself, suburban kids rolling up in their parents’ cars. Using heroin, she says, was like “getting to touch heaven.”

Fitzgerald doesn’t yet have money to pay her, and Padgett herself is still in recovery. But she, and others like her, may play a crucial role in confronting the problem as the face of Portland’s heroin addiction gets younger.

“A lot of them aren’t ready at a younger age,” Fitzgerald says. “The drug scene, it’s fast … it’s different. It’s harder than it was.”

___

Associated Press National Writer Sharon Cohen contributed to this story. Forliti reported from Minnesota; Sewell from Ohio; Duara from Oregon.

EDITOR’S NOTE _ The death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman underscored a troubling development: Heroin, long a scourge of the back alleys of American life, has spread across the country. First of a three-part series.

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Pa. Journals: Cocaine

Posted by Tespid on April 5, 2014

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
1-Apr-2014

 

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Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Penn Medicine points to new ways to prevent relapse in cocaine-addicted patients

Commonly used neurological medication proves successful at blocking brain’s reward system triggers

(PHILADELPHIA) – Relapse is the most painful and expensive feature of drug addiction—even after addicted individuals have been drug-free for months or years, the likelihood of sliding back into the habit remains high. The National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates that 40 to 60 percent of addicted individuals will relapse, and in some studies the rates are as high as 80 percent at six months after treatment. Though some relapse triggers can be consciously avoided, such as people, places and things related to drug use, other subconscious triggers related to the brain’s reward system may be impossible to avoid— they can gain entry to the unconscious brain, setting the stage for relapse.

Researchers at Penn Medicine’s Center for Studies of Addiction have now found that the drug baclofen, commonly used to prevent spasms in patients with spinal cord injuries and neurological disorders, can help block the impact of the brain’s response to “unconscious” drug triggers well before conscious craving occurs. They suggest that this mechanism has the potential to prevent cocaine relapse. The new findings are reported in the Journal of Neuroscience.

“The study was inspired by patients who had experienced moments of ‘volcanic craving’, being suddenly overcome by the extreme desire for cocaine, but without a trigger that they could put their finger on,” says senior author Anna Rose Childress, PhD, research professor of Psychiatry, director of the Brain-Behavioral Vulnerabilities Division in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Childress and colleagues previously found that subliminal drug “reminder cues” (the sights, sounds, smells, and memories of the drug) could activate the brain’s reward circuit. “Now, we wanted to understand whether a medication could inhibit these early brain responses,” said Childress.

Kimberly Young, PhD, an NIH/NIDA Post-doctoral Fellow at Penn, and first author of the study explained that, “Drug reward and motivation is largely mediated by dopamine transmission in the brain’s reward circuit—even drug “reminder cues” can cause dopamine release. Since baclofen and similar medications reduce these effects in laboratory animals, we wanted to examine whether it could prevent drug-cue induced activation in the human brain.”

The study tested baclofen, which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1977 for spasm, on 23 cocaine-dependent men, ages 18 to 55. Each reported using cocaine on at least eight of 30 days before screening. Inclusion in the study required that they stay for up to 10 days in a supervised inpatient drug treatment facility, be drug-free for the duration, not be on any medication affecting dopamine or neurotransmitter response, and have no history of psychosis, seizures, or brain syndromes unrelated to cocaine use.

Upon admission, patients were randomized to receive baclofen (12) or placebo (11). Over the first six days, patients in the baclofen group received the medication in increasing dosage to 60 mg. While on the full 60 mg dose of baclofen, patients were placed in an fMRI and shown a series of images, to measure their neural responses to “ultra-brief” pictures of cocaine or other comparison pictures. Each of the ultra-brief 33 msec “target” pictures was immediately followed by longer picture of non-drug objects or scenes. Under these conditions, the participants are aware of the longer pictures, but the ultra-brief target pictures remain completely outside conscious awareness—they are “backward-masked”.

“We wanted to present the key stimulus: images of drug use and preparation, sexual images, and other aversive images in a way such that the brain could not consciously process them, but so that we could measure their earliest, subconscious effect on the brain,” said Childress.

What the team found was that the patients who were treated with baclofen showed a significantly lower response in the reward and motivational circuits to subliminal cocaine cues versus neutral cues, as compared to the placebo-treated control group. In addition, no difference was seen in the active versus the control group in their response to sexual and aversive cues, indicating that the effects of baclofen on cue-induced brain activation were specific to drug cues.

“These findings suggest that the brain response to drug cues presented outside of awareness can be pharmacologically inhibited, providing a mechanism for baclofen’s potential therapeutic benefit in addiction,” says Young. “Further studies will show whether the prevention of these early brain responses is associated with reduced rates of craving and relapse in cocaine-dependent patients,” added Childress.

 

###

 

This work was supported by NIH grants T32, R01 DA010241, and P50 DA12756, and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania CURE Addiction Center of Excellence. The authors declare no completing financial interests.

Penn Medicine is one of the world’s leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation’s first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4.3 billion enterprise.

The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 17 years, according to U.S. News & World Report’s survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation’s top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $392 million awarded in the 2013 fiscal year.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System’s patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania — recognized as one of the nation’s top “Honor Roll” hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; Chester County Hospital; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital — the nation’s first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Chestnut Hill Hospital and Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2013, Penn Medicine provided $814 million to benefit our community.

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Needle and Bone

Posted by Tespid on April 5, 2014

April 5, 2014

Responding to rise in overdoses, FDA approves Narcan auto-injection device

The Food and Drug Administration approved a new automated medical device, brand name Evzio, that can halt a heroin or other opioid overdose in its tracks (Image courtesy of Kaleo Pharma)
The Food and Drug Administration approved a new automated medical device, brand name Evzio, that can halt a heroin or other opioid overdose in its tracks (Image courtesy of Kaleo Pharma)
Move over EpiPen, a new automated medical device, brand name Evzio, can halt a heroin or other opioid overdose in its tracks.

The Food and Drug Administration approved the new tool on Thursday, after a fast-tracked evaluation process of 15 weeks.

The medicine inside the device, naloxone, sometimes known as Narcan, has been around for years. But the traditional delivery method — needle and syringe — has been a barrier to use, said Dr. Wilson Compton, Deputy Director with the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

He said that overdosing is not new, but “the scale and the increasing numbers of people dying from these substances has created a public health crisis…that’s really what’s driving the new approaches and willingness to try all sorts of new ideas.”

“Having this in an easy-to-use device, that can be administered by minimally-trained persons, is a terrific advance,” says Compton.

Talking technology

Unlike EpiPen, Evzio talks.

A small, plastic and box – about the size of a deck of cards – Evzio speaks in a tinny woman’s voice, instructing the user step-by-step. First, the device asks if the user is ready, then it times the injection for five seconds, and finally tells the user to seek emergency medical attention.

Compton calls this feature one of the device’s strengths, and compares the voiced instructions to another now-commonplace medical technology: defibrillators.

Putting it to use

In Philadelphia, Prevention Point is the only community organization authorized to distribute naloxone. Founded in 1991 as “an underground syringe exchange organization,” it now offers a range of services from case management to HIV counseling.

Program Director Silvana Mazzella, says anything that makes naloxone more affordable and accessible is a step in the right direction. She also says the fast-tracked FDA approval shows that public perception of addiction – and its treatment – is changing.

“I think it’s gaining more traction and it’s going to be seen more as a public health issue and less as an issue that’s related to drug use,” says Mazzella. “Right now when people think of overdose, they think of a certain type of drug, a certain type of person, but people don’t think about this as a medical issue and it is.”

Naloxone is only availably by prescription, so states are taking different approaches to making the technology available to first responders – or perhaps even the general public.

Both Maryland and Massachusetts prescribe and train first responders, outreach workers, and family members of addicts to administer naloxone. Ohio, California, Vermont and New Jersey also have programs in place or are experimenting with pilot programs. In Pennsylvania, officials in Delaware County spoke up earlier this year in support of a proposed bill to permit police to carry the drug.

Mazzella says her organization has reversed 200 self-reported overdoses since 2006 — and that number is likely lower than the true figure.

Nationally, 100 people die from an overdose every day according to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control.

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The personal is the political

Posted by Tespid on April 5, 2014

Development: Mobilize citizens to track sustainability

30 March 2014

Businesses and the public can keep watch when governments fail to provide environmental data, say Angel Hsu and colleagues.

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Che liang/Imaginechina

Apps to measure air quality proliferated in China following controversies with government statistics.

United Nations negotiators are meeting in New York this week to shape up the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that will replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) after 2015. The scope of the SDGs — from providing universal access to energy and water to ending poverty by 2030 — is being well articulated. But there has been little discussion about how countries will monitor that progress.

The variety of global environmental information that will be needed raises daunting challenges. Official data sets are not up to the task. We have found problems with government-reported sources in nearly every global data set that we have used in 15 years of constructing the Environmental Performance Index (EPI) — a biennial ranking of how well countries are implementing policies to address pressing environmental concerns (see epi.yale.edu).

Government investments in environmental monitoring, data collection and reporting are patchy, and are influenced by limited budgets and political motivations. Governments are notorious for underreporting fish catches1, for example, and have been criticized for using capricious definitions, such as of what constitutes ‘forest’2. The global data sets that do exist are often incomplete, erratic or untrustworthy. Conspicuous reporting gaps compromise our understanding of most environmental problems, from toxic chemical exposures, global recycling rates and wetlands loss to freshwater quality, species loss and vulnerability to climate change.

As a result, the data required to track progress towards SDG targets cannot come solely from governments or intergovernmental organizations. UN negotiators must think more creatively about how to measure progress. We argue for channels by which citizen scientists, independent watchdogs, private-sector companies and third-party organizations can contribute data towards monitoring SDG progressand make governments more accountable. Without such independent monitoring, the extent of environmental challenges will not be captured, and SDG-related policies and management decisions risk being ad hoc.

Sensing Earth

Because a pixel in one country is measured in the same way as one in another, satellite data will be invaluable in establishing baselines and benchmarks for the SDGs. Global forest loss over the past decade has been tracked in more than 650,000 images from NASA’s Landsat programme by researchers at the University of Maryland in College Park and by the Google Earth Engine platform, for example3. To estimate how much water countries have underground, NASA and the German Aerospace Center’s orbiting Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment are following changing aquifer levels4.

Yet space imagery is rarely used in the public-policy sphere beyond a few applications, such as land-use planning. Computing power and scale are two reasons. The global forest-loss calculations took the equivalent of 1 million processing hours on 10,000 computers to process 20 terapixels of data — beyond the reach of most national statistical agencies. Many satellite-derived data sets are too coarse in resolution for local decision-makers to act on. Global climate data cannot help a mayor to understand how a city will be affected by rising temperatures.

Nature special: Rio+20

And politics gets in the way. In our experience, many governments question satellite data when comparisons between their countries and others are unfavourable or reveal weaknesses in their statistical reporting systems. Other global environmental measurements such as ocean acidity, which are only beginning to be tracked consistently, will also be susceptible to political pressures.

In January, we published an indicator based on global satellite-derived estimates of fine particulate air pollution in the 2014 EPI (see go.nature.com/tftogi). The Indian government, which like many developing countries does not regularly release such data, was shocked. Government officials in New Delhi were quick to refute the suggestion that their air quality might be as bad as Beijing’s, igniting a public debate.

The misreporting of environmental data by governments is common. The New Zealand government, for instance, which touts a “100% pure” slogan to burnish its ecotourism reputation, was revealed in 2007 to have altered some unfavourable conclusions of a State of the Environment report. The country has not released a comprehensive State of the Environment report since. After demands from citizens and debates in parliament, legislation was introduced last August requiring that bodies independent from the government report on environmental conditions every six months and a compile synthesis report every three years.

Engaging citizens

Enter citizens. They are increasingly contributing environmental measurements and geographical information, through social media, crowdsourcing and open-source databases such as OpenStreetMap, a free and editable map of the world. The World Water Monitoring Challenge, for example, encourages people to record their local water quality and share results (see www.worldwatermonitoringday.org). In 2012, participants made some 250,000 visits to sites in 66 countries, recording parameters such as water temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen. Citizens even monitor plankton abundance in oceans (see www.playingwithdata.com) and donate spare computer time to run climate simulations (see www.climateprediction.net).

User-generated sources can gather more data than any government agency could manage. Every day, people upload roughly 100 terabytes of data to Facebook; send 294 billion e-mails; and write 230 million tweets. Mobile-phone users send and receive 1.3 exabytes of data and each household consumes 375 megabytes of data (see go.nature.com/fhzuqr).

Watches, tablets or phones equipped with sensors could allow millions of citizens to monitor pollutants. Prototypes range from hand-held devices that can measure air and water quality (such as AirBot and WaterBot, developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania); an electronic ‘nose’ that can detect toxic substances in the air; and sensors that can determine nitrate levels in food. Such gadgets now need to be made cheaper and more readily available (the WaterBot is priced at US$99).

Citizens can also track progress using smartphone apps. Since 2013, the Water Reporter app has allowed people in the Chesapeake Bay area in Maryland and Virginia to report local water pollution and other problems to local managers. SeeClickFix has since 2008 allowed city residents to report and track civic issues, from broken streetlights and fire hydrants to street crime. The app has addressed more than 800,000 requests in 170 cities and towns worldwide, including many in the United States, as well as Dublin and Buenos Aires, together representing 25 million people.

Water Environment Federation

Students in Hong Kong test local water quality as part of the World Water Monitoring Challenge.

Chinese citizens have already seen the power of public data collection. In 2011, statistics from a monitor atop the US embassy in Beijing revealed that the air quality was much worse than government statistics claimed. The discrepancies led members of the public to monitor their own air quality, using backpacks, kites and smartphone apps, and a website charting the live results emerged.

Yet user-generated and crowdsourced data have not been discussed for the SDGs (although the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development piloted an online voting system for delegates).

Third parties

Businesses, too, might be better poised than governments to collect environmental data. Coca-Cola, the beverage company, operates in almost every country. It requires more than 9 litres of water to generate $1 of revenue, so relies on accurate knowledge of water resources. Since 2004, the company has invested more than $1.5 million in recording and assessing surface and groundwater levels, stresses and drought severity.

In 2011, the company teamed up with the World Resources Institute, an environmental think tank in Washington DC, to make its proprietary data publicly available through a web platform called Aqueduct. The company is keen to address criticisms of overextraction in water-stressed countries such as India, one of Coca-Cola’s biggest growth markets. It also hopes to galvanize other businesses to evaluate their water impacts and to encourage government leaders in high-risk areas to manage water resources more efficiently, equitably and sustainably.

“If Coca-Cola collects the best global water data, then why not use them?”

Third-party organizations can also validate data. The researchers in the Sea Around Us Project at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, for instance, regularly reconstruct fish-catch data. They have noted that the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization underestimates the percentage of over­exploited and collapsed fish stocks, owing to its use of variable-quality government-reported data and its omission of data from other sources5. The resulting biased view of the status of the world’s fisheries could have disastrous consequences for global aquaculture and ocean health.

In India, the Centre for Science and Environment, a non-profit research organization based in New Delhi, has added its independent analysis to the capital’s air-quality debate. It remains to be seen whether the Indian public will follow China’s example and pressure the government for better air-pollution monitoring, or start monitoring pollution for themselves.

The full potential for private-sector and non-government engagement has not been explored in the SDG negotiations. The most recent progress report states that “business should be part of the solution”, but only by encouraging “greater private sector uptake of sustainability reporting”. A 2013 survey by financial services firm KPMG shows that 71% of companies worldwide are already doing this6. The crucial question is how companies can be incentivized to share data.

Next steps

So, what now? First, SDG negotiators should clarify in the next few months the pivotal questions that better data can help to answer. What knowledge is required for countries to transition to a green economy, for example? What factors define well-being in a society? Then they should consider how those data might be crowdsourced and contemplate incentives for participation. A fund could be created, for example, through contributions from countries, private foundations and companies or through crowdfunding, that would reward the individuals or institutions most capable of collecting needed data.

The UN should consider new forms of collaborations. If Coca-Cola collects the best global water data, then why not use them to measure progress towards a global water SDG? If Google is best able to process vast amounts of satellite data, why not work with it and other scientists to develop algorithms to assess pressing environmental issues?

To replicate the data-driven approaches to city management used by former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg and Maryland governor Martin O’Malley, the UN should provide an online platform for cities to share relevant data on public safety, disaster preparedness and health. Individual innovators who invest in a low-cost technology to engage citizen scientists in data collection for an SDG should be funded to share devices globally.

Second, if citizens are to contribute data to the SDGs, protocols and guidelines must be established to protect individual rights and privacy. Individuals should know how their data will be used and be assured that their privacy is maintained. A starting point for the international harmonization of privacy laws is the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Guidelines on the Protection of Privacy and Trans­border Flows of Personal Data.

In places where information and communication technologies are still emerging, more can be done to equip people with affordable tools to participate equally in the data revolution. The SDG process could foster technology-transfer or funding mechanisms to provide citizens in developing countries with free or cheap personal environmental monitoring devices or community-based systems.

Last, negotiators must find ways to incentivize participation. Corporate or private sponsorship of new data streams (which might not sit well with some audiences who fear commercialization of the SDGs, or worse yet, could have competing private interests that may bias data) could support innovative sustainability-minded companies or individuals to share data. A transparent, centralized online ‘dashboard’ would make it easy for citizens, businesses and third-party institutions to contribute and share data. This could be administered by the UN Environment Programme, which countries at the Rio+20 Earth summit pledged to bolster.

UN negotiators are running out of time to get the SDGs right. It is important to set appropriate targets for promoting sustainable development. Meeting those targets will depend on how well we can track progress, using the best data available, collected by the people and organizations best placed to do so.

Nature
508,
33–35
(03 April 2014)
doi:10.1038/508033a

References

  1. Pauly, D. & Froese, R. Mar. Policy 36, 746752 (2012).

    Show context

  2. Friess, D. A. & Webb, E. L. Environ. Conserv. 38, 15 (2011).

    Show context

  3. Hansen, M. C., Stehman, S. V. & Potapov, P. V. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107, 86508655 (2010).

    Show context

  4. Rodell, M. & Famiglietti, J. S. J. Hydrol. 263, 245256 (2002).

    Show context

  5. Froese, R., Zeller, D., Kleisner, K. & Pauly, D. Mar. Biol. 159, 12831292 (2012).

    Show context

  6. KPMG. The KPMG Survey of Corporate Sustainability Reporting 2013 (KPMG, 2013).

    Show context

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Angel Hsu is director of the Environmental Performance Measurement Program at the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

  2. Omar Malik is an environmental performance analysts at the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

  3. Laura Johnson is an environmental performance analysts at the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

  4. Daniel C. Esty is professor of environmental law and policy at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Corresponding author

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Screenshot: If I didn’t my integrity would be at risk.

Posted by Tespid on April 5, 2014

The hipster war on you: How liberals use cool as a weapon

Why are good things seen as bad, and why are bad things seen as good?

Greg Gutfeld poses the question and supplies an answer in “Not Cool: The Hipster Elite and Their War On You” (Crown Forum). Gutfeld paints a picture of a coolocracy in which the world is run by star-bellied Sneetches who tell us what’s hip and we obediently keep running in and out of the belly-star-making gizmo.

Icons of cool like Robert Redford, Mark Zuckerberg, Jesse James and Yoko Ono get shredded in the book, which is as breezy, enlightening and funny as Gutfeld’s two TV shows, “The Five” and “Red Eye.”

On both shows, the way he delivers truths disguised as jokes makes him a kind of reverse Jon Stewart.

Gutfeld finds that cool warps everything. In 2012, for instance, Zuckerberg’s Facebook not only didn’t pay any net federal income tax but was actually due a refund of about $430 million. Why? Because the company (lawfully) deducted the stock options it issues to Facebook employees, many of them now deliriously wealthy because of those options. If Exxon or Koch Industries had managed that, someone might have noticed.

Modal Trigger

But because it was Facebook — a company that oozes cool out its pores — it was a one-day story that people forgot about. “If this company were something that actually made something in a factory or a field,” writes Gutfeld, “it would be roundly condemned by every single media hack on the planet.”

Never mind that companies like Exxon and Koch supply the energy without which Facebook wouldn’t work: They’re not cool.

Hipster iconoclasm dates back at least to the 1950s (James Dean, Marlon Brando), but cool remained outside the establishment until the Woodstock Generation began to take over. It imposed warped values — artfully cultivated rebellion, counterproductive liberal “social consciousness,” romantic outlaw status for murderous enemies of America (the Weather Underground, Mumia Abu-Jamal, the Boston Marathon bombers) — on the mainstream. Today Flower Power types run the media, the networks, the Hollywood studios, even the Justice Department.

But ask someone in their 80s and 90s what’s cool, Gutfeld figures, and they’d probably say something like, “Killing Nazis.”

A 1950s study that tried to measure coolness of jobs identified five factors that gave a career prestige: importance of the task performed, level of authority you have, the know-how required, the dignity of the tasks required and pay.

Scoring highest were jobs like bankers, executives, ministers and professors.

Fast-forward to today, when, writes Gutfeld, “the Labor Department reports that only 47% of Americans have a full-time job. That’s because it’s hard to get full-time work as a maker of artisanal tricycles.” “Raising awareness” didn’t strike anyone as much of a career in the 1950s, but a recent survey of 350 college students discovered that “social consciousness,” i.e., daft activities like collecting signatures on petitions for Greenpeace, was among the accepted cool traits.

The end result of eco-minded hipster thinking is, for example, the San Francisco ban on plastic shopping bags. This well-intentioned move in favor of all that is green and natural actually wound up killing people. Why? Because when you use bags to transport food, bacteria collects in them.

Reusing that Earth-friendly tote gradually turns it into a chemical weapon. The ban, declared a University of Pennsylvania study, “is associated with a 46% increase in death from food-borne illnesses. That implies an increase of 5.5 annual deaths for the county.” (The researchers added that this was a conservative estimate.)

So the bag ban is basically a serial killer on the loose. But it’s cool because we probably saved the lives of at least five seagulls, and more important, it makes us feel cool. More cities are sure to follow. A similar jihad against DDT, which saved an estimated 500 million lives, according to The Economist, has led to the deaths of perhaps millions in Africa, where cool environmentalism meets cold, hard reality. Now a few groovy artisanal types are sounding the alarm about vaccines, with predictably depressing results.

A year ago, a Florida county saw its first death from whooping cough in decades. The victim, a baby, had parents who decided not to vaccinate.

Vaccines, DDT, genetically modified foods — all these things are unnatural or impure, hence suspect.

“Purity is a big thing with the coolerati,” notes Gutfeld. “But, like cool, it exists separate from the notions of good and evil. Pure sugar is delicious. How about pure cocaine? How about pure horses–t?” That depends: Is it locally sourced?

OK, so why aren’t conservatives cool? Gutfeld makes a valid point: “From my experience being around conservatives, it’s extremely frustrating how dismissive they are of ‘weird’ things, and that hurts them.”

Gutfeld chooses the music that backs his segments on “The Five” and “my choices are never met with ‘That’s good’ or ‘That sucks.’ It’s always rewarded with anguished looks on the other panelists’ faces and the two-word review, ‘That’s weird.’ ”

Automatically dismissing tradition and latching onto whatever’s new isn’t cool. But neither is being closed-minded.

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As Requested

Posted by Tespid on March 31, 2014

People find me a little past Jupiter sometimes when trying to make sense out of my quips and parables. I forget too what I am saying and the common sense tone of the moment passes on without a second thought. All I feel is that cold stare over glasses wondering if I planned to make a serious revelation or just expounding on a Parkinson’s moment.

I was stepping out of the shower and nothing about the world outside could have been farther from my mind. Last foot out and a mental imprint literally grows about two feet in front of me. I knew what it was and knew there was nothing I could do about it. Passing out was a far gone conclusion and there was no need to call out Christ’s name as everything was safe. There grew in front of me was a healthy sunflower stalk, a small tomato bush burgeoning with fruit and a tall stalk of corn tall yet still pushing up from the ground. Eery single bit was healthy and I had no time to write because I was running late for work.

This vision happened about six years ago. It was right after the massive floods in Iowa that took the corn crop for than year. We all paid dearly for it because the cost of the ethanol additive to gasoline went up and gas prices spiked for a good season or so. At least till the next harvest and processing. The other grace of that which follows is the salmonella infection on tomatoes that occurred within a year of the blight on the corn. The USDA and Mexico investigated for months. Being in Texas I wondered wether a food staple would be affected, meaning salsa.

If I take a moment and trying to pen things down, even hereon line. I wonder if it is worth telling at all. Joseph had the gift of interpretation and blessed pharaoh dearly. Still for him, timeliness was a gift of the spirit that no one can argue with. I never found the vision’s reference to sunflowers come about. The stickler is the vision still lingers with me as do the vegetable peas.

I’ll try not to keep my mouth shut for so long and check my logs for anything interesting more often. I wonder if the dream was to say that the crops will return more hearty? There was no number reference except that there were three item that I recall so late in the decade. Three years for each to return to significant production. In that case tomatos where the shortest, the corn, then sunflowers. All where bright in color, no insects and healthy in appearance.

I hope my interpretation get better. They are my dreams after all.

~Mother Snow Goose.

 

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Confused in Transmission

Posted by Tespid on March 27, 2014

This is what I thought I heard. There is no chance for a repeat, so you might chalk it up to gossip or an active imagination. What I heard was that people are raping themselves and blaming it on police officers. If it comes back around, either corrections or confirmations, I’ll post. If the information helps, that’s wonderful. Either way stay safe.

~NCC.

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Screenshots: Assorted Chocolates

Posted by Tespid on March 14, 2014

 

Title: US Covert Ops in Iran
Author: DC
Date: 2005.01.17 08:04
Description: In an article published today by the New Yorker magazine, investigative journalist Seymour Hersh says the US has covert commandos operating in Iran, identifying potential military targets and nuclear weapons sites. Darby Hickey of the DC Radio Coop reports. <a href=”http://images.indymedia.org/imc/washingtondc/media/audio/5/114568_fsrn20050117irancommandos_darby.mp3″>Audio</a&gt;

 

Title: Bolton U.N. confirmation hearing disrupted, activists insist he does not represent real American security needs, that Senate panel does not represent them
Author: DC
Date: 2005.04.11 03:03
Description: <p> In Washington today local peace activists who appeared to be with the group <a href=”http://www.codepink4peace.org/”>Code Pink</a> disrupted the <a href=”http://foreign.senate.gov/hearing.html”>Senate Foreign Relations Committee</a> confirmation hearing of John Bolton. Bolton has been nominated by President Bush to be the next Ambassador to the United Nations. </p> <p> The activists held up banners, among those, one stated “John Bolton = Nuclear Proliferation” highlighting a frequent criticism of the <a href=”http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ops/psi.htm”>Proliferation Security Initiative</a>, an extra-UN “multi-lateral” agreement many see as run by the United States and being myopic an a means to more subtle and covert ends. At one point near the beginning of the disruption someone stood up and blocked the camera view of CSPAN briefly. From the CSPAN broadcast 3 separate individuals or sets of individuals with pink banners were dicernable, standing up in different parts of the public gallery. They were all removed. One participant squeezed in a D.C. representation issue, vocally noting there was no Senator for D.C. to possibly participate in this hearing and represent their views. </p>

 

Title: “Islamic Terrorists” supported by Uncle Sam: Bush Administration “Black Ops” directed against Iran, Lebanon and Syria
Author: Michel Chossudovsky
Date: 2007.06.24 01:49
Description: “The pretext for these stepped up military actions are Syria’s alleged support of Fatah Al Islam and Damascus’ supposed involvement in the assassination of Rafiq Hariri. The timely “investigation” into Hariri’s assassination and the setting up of a kangaroo court are being used by the coalition to foment anti-Syrian sentiment in Lebanon. From a military and strategic standpoint, Lebanon is the gateway into Syria. The destabilization of Lebanon supports the US-NATO-Israeli military agenda directed against Syria and Iran. US intelligence sets loose its Islamic brigades, while also accusing the enemy of sponsoring terrorist groups, which are in fact covertly supported and financed by Uncle Sam.”

 

Title: U.S. Special Forces To Create Private ‘Media’ Corp
Author: Steve Peacock
Date: 2005.06.01 12:40
Description: The U.S. Special Operations Command will spend up to a half-billion dollars over the next five years to develop pre-packaged media products for distribution to foreign news organizations and audiences, according to government planning documents obtained by IMC-Binghamton.

 

Title: palestine journal: 25 august: israeli ceasefire violations don’t count
Author: Portland
Date: 2006.08.29 06:39
Description: <p>”Twelve day ceasefire continues to hold” say the headlines. but what they really mean is that, in the twelve days since the UN-brokered ceasefire began, no rockets have been fired by Hezbollah into israel. what is left out is that in every single one of those twelve days since the “ceasefire”, israeli forces have continued to launch raids deep into lebanon, and to drop missiles from airplanes onto the already-devastated ruins of lebanon…</p><p>jonathan cook, an analyst in israel, has this to say about the ‘baalbek raid’: “Israeli special forces launched the covert operation to capture a Hizbullah leader, Sheikh Mohammed Yazbak, way beyond the Litani River, the northern extent of Israel’s supposed ‘buffer zone’. The hit squad were disguised not only as Arabs — a regular ploy by units called ‘mistarvim’ — but as Lebanese soldiers driving in Lebanese army vehicles. When their cover was blown, Hizbullah opened fire, killing one Israeli and wounding two more in a fierce gun battle.</p><p class=”readmore”><a href=”http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2006/08/345034.shtml&#8221; class=”rm”>read more >></a></p><h2 class=”feathead”>palestine journal: 21 august</h2><p>i, unfortunately, recently made the mistake of engaging a zionist in an online forum…big mistake. but there was one statement that she made in the course of the ‘discussion’ that i’d like to expand upon a little.</p><p>the statement was made in regard to the ‘security procedures’ at the allenby bridge border crossing between the west bank and jordan, which is tightly controlled by israeli security…..as I questioned the beatings, harassment, delays and etc. there, she said, basically, “palestinians should be expected to endure extra security procedures – after all, look at what they’ve put israel through….”</p><p class=”readmore”><a href=”http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2006/08/344821.shtml&#8221; class=”rm”>read more >></a></p><p><b>related:</b> <a href=”http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2006/08/345127.shtml”>Palestine Today</a></p>

 

Title: Snitches, Security and Suspected ELFers
Author: Portland
Date: 2006.01.18 02:38
Description: A discussion of basic movement security and the federal snitch program. With the recent round of arrests of suspected ELFers, it is a good time to remind ourselves of security issues. I am hoping to initiate a discussion on basic movement and covert ops security. I’m sure I can’t think of everything, so add your comments if you think you have something useful to share. <p>Rule number one: Shut the fuck up! Never, ever, ever talk about an action after it has happened. What could be the point? To relive old times? Too risky. The USA PATRIOT Act has removed all “statute of limitations,” labeled even our weakest actions “terrorism,” and increased sentencing guidelines tenfold. Take your actions back to the earth with you. The FBI would be nowhere in their investigations if no one was talking.</p><p>Once in custody, shut the fuck up! Get a lawyer. (If your lawyer advises you that talking will get you a lighter sentence, get a new lawyer.) Don’t admit to anything. REFUSE TO SPEAK ABOUT OTHERS. Anyone who watches TV knows (and for those of you who don’t) THE POLICE LIE TO GET YOU TO TALK. How basic is that? You can’t believe a word they say. They will break every law and civil right on the books to get information. They are motivated by arrests and convictions, not truth and justice, not saving the planet, not being your friend, or even being a respectable cop. They have no shame. They are NOT trying to help you. They DO NOT have the power to make deals, plea bargains or “talk to the judge or DA.” They are out to screw you and/or all of your friends.</p><p>We cannot let the feds and a few snitches deter our “movement.” Instead, we need to learn from our mistakes and get back to the important work of stopping the real eco-terrorists.</p><p><a href=”http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2006/01/332055.shtml”>Jonathan Paul arrested in Southern Oregon</a></p>

 

Title: The Indypendent Issue #125: Rebels on the Street
Author: NYC
Date: 2008.09.15 09:38
Description: In the Indypendent’s latest issue, our cover story follows Rebel Diaz, the South Bronx-based political hip-hop trio. Rebel Diaz was involved with an altercation with the NYPD, and now face two misdemeanors. Timothy Murray reports: “The legal struggle continues for South Bronx-based hip-hop activists Rodrigo and Gonzalo Venegas, who were aggressively arrested by New York Police Department officers June 18. The brothers, members of the popular group Rebel Diaz, said they were trying to help a street vendor on Southern Boulevard in Hunts Point who, they felt, was being harassed by police officers.” <br/><br/>For the full article, see the link to “South Bronx Rhythm Resistance below. <br/><br/>Also included in this issue: Exploring a “new New Journalism,” by Donald Paneth; roundups of both the DNC and the RNC; the “Bigger Better Bottle Bill” now being considered in Albany; and a look at New Orleans three years after Katrina devastated the city, exposing stark divisions of race and class. <br/><br/> <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/12/south-bronx-rhythm-resistance/”>South Bronx Rhythm Resistance</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/12/city-pushes-school-to-brink/”>City Pushes Arab-American School to the Brink</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/12/bigger-better-bottle-bill/”>NY State Considers ‘Bigger, Better Bottle Bill’</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/12/developer-retreats-on-fort-greene/”>Developer Retreats on Fort Greene Plan</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/12/protesting-harsh-school-policing/”>Protesting Harsh School Policing</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/12/health-activism-takes-root/”>Health Activism Takes Root</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/12/wake-up-wbai-listeners/”>BUDGET: A Wake-Up Call to WBAI Listeners</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/pedaling-for-immigrant-rights/”>Pedaling for Immigrant Rights</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/community-calendar-5/”>Community Calendar Sept. 12-Oct 2.</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/reader-comments-9/”>Reader Comments</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/another-look-at-the-conventions/”>Another Look at the Conventions</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/three-years-after-katrina/”>Three Years After Katrina, A City Still Threatened</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/new-york-students-help-rebuild/”>New York Students Help Rebuild New Orleans</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/zardari-and-pakistan/”>Zardari and Pakistan: The Godfather as President</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/international-briefs-3/”>International Briefs</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/artists-journey/”>Artist’s Journey to 21st Century Motherhood</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/american-perspective/”>American Perspective: Creating a New New Journalism</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/reagan-legacy/”>Reagan Legacy Counters Biblical Parable</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/big-squeeze/”>Big Squeeze More Like a Bear Hug</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/covert-ops-hit-chavez/”>Covert Ops Hit Chavez</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/regrounding-education-policy/”>Regrounding Public Education Policy: A Review of All Things Being Equal</a> || <a href=”http://www.indypendent.org/2008/09/11/the-macktivist-2/”>The Macktivist: Trash the World Can Handle</a>

 

Title: A Risky Game of Risk: MAUREEN DOWD – ‘I feel good about the new war with Iran’ +
Author: MAUREEN DOWD
Date: 2007.01.13 01:19
Description: DOWD: I feel good about the new war with Iran.

 

Title: Predictable Torture of Iraqi Prisoners
Author: Gary Sudborough
Date: 2004.05.02 03:59
Description: The torture of Iraqi prisoners of war is part of US counterinsurgency strategy and is not due simply to a few deranged, sadistic American soldiers.

Title: PARANOIA GRIPS THE U.S. CAPITAL
Author: Eric Margolis
Date: 2005.02.07 11:05
Description: Life imitates art. This week, former military intelligence analyst William Arkin revealed a hitherto unknown directive, with the Orwellian name “JCS Conplan 0300-97,” authorizing the Pentagon to employ special, ultra-secret “anti-terrorist” military units on American soil for what the author claims are “extra-legal missions.” In other words, using U.S. soldiers to kill or arrest Americans, acts that have been illegal since the U.S. Civil War.

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Air VII

Posted by Tespid on March 14, 2014

Posted in Air | Leave a Comment »

Status Update

Posted by Tespid on March 13, 2014

I took on a new assignment and have started in as you can tell.

I’ll be making it back to other requests as I can focusing on this and next month.

Till I recoop completely posts may vary. The problem is that I damaged my right arm and

the pain is intermittent, but significantly there. Meanwhile I’ll be relaxing, which has yet to happen,

and trying more reading.

 

Stay well and look forward into Spring.

First rains tend to wash away winter’s death and feed every type of roots’ growth.

~W.H. Tespid, ERT

 

Posted in Status Updates | Leave a Comment »

 
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